What Los Angeles Teachers Are Fighting For is What NC Teachers Are Fighting For

If you did not know, UTLA (the United Teachers of Los Angeles) will be going on strike starting tomorrow. And like the “strikes” that happened in West Virginia, Arizona, and Oklahoma and the march in North Carolina, the issue isn’t really all about teacher pay – it’s about funding schools fully.

Dr. Diane Ravitch posted on her blog a report from Capital & Main out of California called “Why a Teachers Strike in Los Angeles Could Bring Big Rewards as Well as Risks.”

If you marched in North Carolina on May 16th, then you will see the similarities between what is happening in North Carolina and Los Angeles.

If Los Angeles’ public school teachers go on strike Monday, they will face off against a school district headed by superintendent Austin Beutner, a multimillionaire investment banker and former L.A. Times publisher with no experience in education policy. Perhaps more important, this strike will play out on an education landscape that has radically changed since 1989, when the United Teachers Los Angeles union last walked out. Foremost has been the national rise of charter schools — which, in California, are tax-supported, nonprofit schools that operate within public school districts, yet with far less oversight and transparency than traditional schools. Only a fraction of charter schools are unionized, a situation preferred by the charters’ most influential supporters, who include some of California’s wealthiest philanthropists.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Kent Wong, executive director of the University of California, Los Angeles’ Labor Center, notes that UTLA’s demands have moved away from larger raises and toward more funding to alleviate the deep education cuts that have been made over the years.

“It is important to understand the bigger forces at work here,” said Wong, who added that the pro-charter forces have invested millions of dollars to elect a pro-charter majority on the Los Angeles school board to shift resources from public schools to charters.

 

All strikes are risky undertakings and it’s an axiom that no one wins a strike. But a UTLA walkout would dramatically raise the stakes by casting the strike as a challenge to the creeping absorption of public schools by private charter management organizations.

“A strike is a big deal,” Wong said, because “you have this massive privatization scheme that’s been gutting support for public education and resources for public education. That’s the broader scenario that’s at stake here.”

Massive privatization scheme? That’s not just happening in Los Angeles.

It’s happening in NC.

la teachers

 

One thought on “What Los Angeles Teachers Are Fighting For is What NC Teachers Are Fighting For

  1. Pingback: What Los Angeles Teachers Are Fighting For is What NC Teachers Are Fighting For – Education Article – Education Blog

Comments are closed.