The Compare and Contrast Paper – EdWeek.org’s Interesting Article

 

This past week Education Week released an online compare and contrast the candidates on all things education. It is entitled “Compare the Candidates: Where Do Clinton and Trump Stand on Education?” You may find it here – http://www.edweek.org/ew/section/multimedia/president-candidates-trump-clinton-education.html.

When my wife shared this particular link with me, I imagined that I had already known where each candidate stood on issues such as school choice and common core, but this investigation went further including issues such as bullying, college access school construction, spending, and teacher quality.

When you click on any of the “topics” you will see a bullet list of points made by each candidate at the bottom of the screen.

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The compare / contrast bullet points are very helpful, but the quotes that serve as a prelude for each candidate’s position offer a very clear perspective in the major difference between Clinton and Trump when it pertains to public schools.

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And that difference is fostering an environment of collaboration versus one of competition.

The following table is a list of the quotes that were drawn from the EdWeek.org article for particularly hot-button items concerning pubic education in North Carolina. I have highlighted (rather bolded) key buzzwords and phrases that appear in those quotes. When those buzzwords are put together in groups according to the candidates, something very stark appears – the difference between collaboration and competition.

Issue Clinton’s Words Trump’s Words
Academic Standards “When I think about the really unfortunate argument that’s been going on around common core, it’s very painful, because the common core started off as a bipartisan effort—it was actually nonpartisan. It wasn’t politicized, it was to try to come up with a core of learning that we might expect students to achieve across our country.”

—Community college speech as reported by The Washington Post, April 2015

 

“So, common core is a total disaster. We can’t let it continue.”

—Facebook video

 

Bullying “Bullying has always been around, but it seems to have gotten somehow easier and more widespread because of social media and the Internet. … I think we all need to be aware of the pain and the anguish that bullying can cause.” —Iowa town hall even No specific quote from

Trump. However, The Southern Poverty Law Center, an advocacy group, recently cited an unscientific survey of teachers it said shows that Trump’s campaign rhetoric is linked to more students feeling unsafe or singled out by their peers.

 

Early-Childood Education “It’s hard enough to pay for any preschool or child care at all, let alone the quality programs that help kids develop and flourish. Funding for these opportunities has not kept up with changing times and rising demand.”

—Campaign appearance in New Hampshire

 

No specific quote from Trump. Hasn’t laid out any thoughts about early education as a Republican presidential candidate
School Choice “I have for many years now, about 30 years, supported the idea of charter schools, but not as a substitute for the public schools, but as a supplement for the public schools.”

—Town hall meeting, South Carolina

 

“Education reformers call this school choice, charter schools, vouchers, even opportunity scholarships. I call it competition—the American way.”

—The America We Deserve

 

School Spending No specific quote from Clinton. However, Has said sufficient education funding is necessary to implement the Every Student Succeeds Act. Has called for new investments in computer science education, early-childhood education, college access, and more.

Wants to double funding for the Education Innovation and Research grants, the successor to the $120 million Investing in Innovation program.

 

“We’re number one in terms of cost per pupil by a factor of, worldwide, by a factor of many. Number two is so far behind, forget it.”

—CNN town hall

 

Teacher Quality “I want all educators, at every stage of your careers, to know that they’ll be able to keep learning, improving, innovating. And that goes for administrators, too.”

—Speech to National Education Association

 

“Our public schools have grown up in a competition-free zone surrounded by a very high union wall.”

—The America We Deserve

 

Testing Tests should go back to their original purpose, giving useful information to teachers and parents. … But when you’re forced to teach to a test, our children miss out on some of the most valuable lessons.”

—Speech to National Education Association

 

No quote.

 

With Clinton’s quotes you see words and phrases like “”bipartisanship”, “aware of the pain and anguish” of bullying, “opportunities”, “all”, charter schools that should not “as a substitute for the public schools”, and that “tests should go back to their original purpose.”

With Trump, words and phrases include “disaster”, “competition”, “wall”, and “forget it.”

I have been very consistent in my views concerning collaboration and competition in the public service arena. And I will state it again as I have before with Rep. Skip Stam here in NC,

 “Effective public schools are collaborative communities, not buildings full of contractors who are determined to outperform others for the sake of money. And when teachers are forced to focus on the results of test scores, teaching ceases from being a dynamic relationship between student and teacher, but becomes a transaction driven by a carrot on an extended stick. Furthermore, the GOP-led NCGA still does not seem to acknowledge that student growth is different than student test scores. When some of our colleagues deal with students who experience more poverty, health issues, and other factors, then how can you say that those teachers do not “grow” those students when an arbitrary test score is all that is used to measure students?”

If you read the quotes for all of the topics explored in the EdWeek.org article, you might see one candidate actually trying to listen to teachers.

The other one is not.

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